20 Spring Cleaning Tips to Make Your Life Easier

20 Spring Cleaning Tips to Make Your Life Easier

Follow these expert-approved methods for an easy way to keep your home spotless.

1 of 20

Countertops
Image is not available

It's surprising how quickly crud can build up behind items stored on the counter. If you have a natural stone counter (granite, quartz, marble), use a high-quality stone cleaner. If you have an acrylic or laminate countertop, using a kitchen cleaner works well. After selecting your preferred cleaner, move all items off of the counter for a deep clean.

Photo by Francesca Tosolini on Unsplash

2 of 20

Fridge
Image is not available

It's great to wipe out the center of the shelves, but don't forget about what's lurking in the corners. Remove food and shelving one at a time and clean shelves and fridge shelf brackets with warm, soapy water. Removing shelves one at a time prevents food from being out of the fridge for too long.

Image by Julio Pablo Vázquez from Pixabay

3 of 20

Kitchen Cabinets
Image is not available

Cabinets tend to build up gunk on the top, handle, and corners of doors. Also, a surprising amount of build-up can occur in shelf corners, even when food is not stored in them.

If cabinets are laminate, any kitchen-specific cleaner will work. If they are finished wood, a cabinet cream is best. For inside the cabinets, use a crevice device attached to the vacuum cleaner. If scrubbing needs to be done, use the back of a dry kitchen sponge. The key here is not to get raw wood wet, as it may warp.

Image by Jazella from Pixabay

4 of 20

Oven
Image is not available

With regular use, ovens build up a lot of grime. If your oven is a steam clean model, then add the recommended amount of water and start the cleaning cycle. If you have self (non-steam) cleaning, wipe out large bits and run a self-clean cycle. Wipe out any remaining bits. If you have neither, oven cleaner and scrubbing pads will get the job done.

Image by Stefan Asafti from Unsplash

5 of 20

Kitchen Backsplash
Image is not available

Backsplashes catch all that grease splatter from exhuberant cooking sessions. It's easy to forget to wipe it down right after cooking, and this allows for the splatters to dry onto tile and grout. Use a neutral-ph tile cleaner to get that backsplash looking like new.

Image by Christian Mackie from Unsplash

6 of 20

Shower Curtains
Image is not available

Hard water and soap scum build up residue and mildew (and sometimes mold). Fabric, plastic, and vinyl shower curtains can be washed in the washing machine. If hand washing them in the bathroom, opt for a cleaner that contains bleach (or make your own bleach solution). Don't forget to rinse it thoroughly before stepping in the shower.

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

7 of 20

Bathroom Cabinets
Image is not available

Bathroom cabinets can collect years of clutter, and before you know it there are things in it you didn't remember buying. Start by removing everything and discarding what is not regularly used. Next, use a cleaner safe for the type of material the cabinet is made from.

Image by Steven Ungermann from Unsplash

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

8 of 20

Mattress
Image is not available

Start by vacuuming all of the crevices on the top of the mattress with a furniture tool attachment on the vacuum. Then use a fabric steamer to kill any potential dust mites on the mattress surface. If you don't have a steamer, Lysol can be used. However, you could void your warranty if leaving a stain on the mattress from the Lysol.

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

9 of 20

Microwave
Image is not available

Place a 2-cup capacity Pyrex measuring cup 3/4 full of water in the microwave, and heat on high for 6 minutes (longer if you have a low-wattage microwave). The steam from the boiling water will loosen crud, and it can be wiped away with a damp sponge. Follow that up with a food-safe disinfectant for a thorough clean.

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

10 of 20

Washing Machine
Image is not available

Disinfect the washing machine with a mild solution of bleach to keep the smells away. Most home washing machines have a special place to pour 1 cup of bleach. Pour the bleach in there and run a cycle. If you don't like the idea of bleach, use dishwasher cleaning tabs.

Image by Steve Buissinne from Pixabay

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

11 of 20

Dryer
Image is not available

According to the U.S. Fire Administration, 2,900 fires are reported from home clothes dryer machines. To avoid a dryer fire, it is best to have a professional clean the dryer vent piping at least once a year. What you can do to help is ensure the lint screen is cleaned at the beginning of each cycle.

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

12 of 20

Blinds
Image is not available

Spring is a great time to clean accumulated dust from all the blinds in the house. A swifter for dusting is a great tool that holds a lot of dust before needing a pad change. Another method is to roll up a micro-fiber cloth and tape it onto a broom handle or to each side of grilling tongs. This method works well, but expect to change the cloth a lot as it won't hold as much dust as a swifter.

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

13 of 20

Dishwasher
Image is not available

Fill a drinking glass or Pyrex measuring cup with 2 cups (16oz) of distilled white vinegar and run a cycle. This natural cleaning method is a great way to remove smells from the dishwasher.


Note: if you have leftover water in the bottom of the dishwasher after a cycle, you have a partial clog in either the food chopping screen or the water ejector line.

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

14 of 20

Deep Freezer Defrost
Image is not available

If you're tired of taking hours to defrost the chest freezer, then this method is what you're looking for.
Either turn off the thermostat or unplug the freezer. Remove all foods. Layer 10 paper towels in the bottom. Place a large pot of boiling water on the paper towels, close the lid, and leave for 30 minutes (If frost is extremely bad, this process can be repeated). Use the paper towels to wipe up any remaining moisture.

Image by Dev Benjamin from Unsplash

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

15 of 20

Ceiling Fans
Image is not available

When fans spin, the attract dust (for why, see #2 here- 25 Grossest Areas in the Home). To clean the tops of the blades, a swifter works well because of the large amount of dust it holds. If a swifter is not available, place the fan blade inside the pillow case and wipe the dust into the inside of the pillow case.

Image by alvinmatt from Pixabay

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

16 of 20

Windows
Image is not available

Easily clean windows like the pro's with dish soap, warm water, a bucket, and a squeegee. Mix a tablespoon of dish soap with two gallons of water. Use the foam side of the squeegee to apply the solution to the window, then flip the squeegee to remove the solution for a perfect, streak-free window. Bonus: a long pole can be attached to the squeegee to reach second floor windows without getting on a ladder.

Image by Vecislavas Popa from Pexels

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

17 of 20

Vacuum Cleaner
Image is not available

Vacuum cleaner "cleaning" is commonly forgotten, but needs to be done on a regular basis. Most new vacuums have reusable air filters installed. Remove the air filters, rinse with hot water, and let air dry. The brush in the vacuum head also accumulates hair and fibers. Cut them with scissors and remove them to allow the vacuum to clean to the best of its ability.

Image by Steve Buissinne from Pixabay

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

18 of 20

Stovetop
Image is not available

Use a wet soft scrubbing sponge to remove bits of baked-on food and wipe clean. Mix baking soda and water to a paste-like consistency and scrub to remove stubborn build-up on cooking rings. (This method works for traditional and glass-top stoves)

Image by p_kennedy123 from Pixabay

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

19 of 20

Shelves
Image is not available

Remove all items from the shelves and use a damp soft scrubbing sponge to wipe clean. If the shelves are made of unfinished wood, either be very careful with a damp sponge (to prevent wood warping), or wipe with a dry sponge.

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

20 of 20

Shower head
Image is not available

Minerals from the water flowing through the shower head slowly leave deposits inside the shower head. Removing the buildup can be done with regular household items.

Get a gallon ziplock bag and fill halfway with half white vinegar and half water. Remove shower head from piping and place in the bag. Squeeze the bag to remove air and let sit overnight. Reinstall shower head in the morning.

Have a large shower head that needs cleaning? Use a bucket instead of a bag and adjust the vinegar and water mixture accordingly.

Image by Francesca Tosolini from Unsplash

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Don’t want to click through the slideshow? Read all the tips below!

  1. Countertops

It’s surprising how quickly crud can build up behind items stored on the counter. If you have a natural stone counter (granite, quartz, marble), use a high-quality stone cleaner. If you have an acrylic or laminate countertop, using a kitchen cleaner works well. After selecting your preferred cleaner, move all items off of the counter for a deep clean.

  1. Fridge

It’s great to wipe out the center of the shelves, but don’t forget about what’s lurking in the corners. Remove food and shelving one at a time and clean shelves and fridge shelf brackets with warm, soapy water. Removing shelves one at a time prevents food from being out of the fridge for too long.

  1. Kitchen Cabinets

Cabinets tend to build up gunk on the top, handle, and corners of doors. Also, a surprising amount of build-up can occur in shelf corners, even when food is not stored in them.

If cabinets are laminate, any kitchen-specific cleaner will work. If they are finished wood, a cabinet cream is best. For inside the cabinets, use a crevice device attached to the vacuum cleaner. If scrubbing needs to be done, use the back of a dry kitchen sponge. The key here is not to get raw wood wet, as it may warp.

  1. Oven

With regular use, ovens build up a lot of grime. If your oven is a steam clean model, then add the recommended amount of water and start the cleaning cycle. If you have self (non-steam) cleaning, wipe out large bits and run a self-clean cycle. Wipe out any remaining bits. If you have neither, oven cleaner and scrubbing pads will get the job done.

  1. Kitchen Backsplash

Backsplashes catch all that grease splatter from exhuberant cooking sessions. It’s easy to forget to wipe it down right after cooking, and this allows for the splatters to dry onto tile and grout. Use a neutral-ph tile cleaner to get that backsplash looking like new.

  1. Shower Curtains

Hard water and soap scum build up residue and mildew (and sometimes mold). Fabric, plastic, and vinyl shower curtains can be washed in the washing machine. If hand washing them in the bathroom, opt for a cleaner that contains bleach (or make your own bleach solution). Don’t forget to rinse it thoroughly before stepping in the shower.

  1. Bathroom Cabinets

Bathroom cabinets can collect years of clutter, and before you know it there are things in it you didn’t remember buying. Start by removing everything and discarding what is not regularly used. Next, use a cleaner safe for the type of material the cabinet is made from.

  1. Mattress

Start by vacuuming all of the crevices on the top of the mattress with a furniture tool attachment on the vacuum. Then use a fabric steamer to kill any potential dust mites on the mattress surface. If you don’t have a steamer, Lysol can be used. However, you could void your warranty if leaving a stain on the mattress from the Lysol.

  1. Microwave

Place a 2-cup capacity Pyrex measuring cup 3/4 full of water in the microwave, and heat on high for 6 minutes (longer if you have a low-wattage microwave). The steam from the boiling water will loosen crud, and it can be wiped away with a damp sponge. Follow that up with a food-safe disinfectant for a thorough clean.

  1. Washing Machine

Disinfect the washing machine with a mild solution of bleach to keep the smells away. Most home washing machines have a special place to pour 1 cup of bleach. Pour the bleach in there and run a cycle. If you don’t like the idea of bleach, use dishwasher cleaning tabs.

  1. Dryer

According to the U.S. Fire Administration, 2,900 fires are reported from home clothes dryer machines. To avoid a dryer fire, it is best to have a professional clean the dryer vent piping at least once a year. What you can do to help is ensure the lint screen is cleaned at the beginning of each cycle.

  1. Blinds

Spring is a great time to clean accumulated dust from all the blinds in the house. A swifter for dusting is a great tool that holds a lot of dust before needing a pad change. Another method is to roll up a micro-fiber cloth and tape it onto a broom handle or to each side of grilling tongs. This method works well, but expect to change the cloth a lot as it won’t hold as much dust as a swifter.

  1. Dishwasher

Fill a drinking glass or Pyrex measuring cup with 2 cups (16oz) of distilled white vinegar and run a cycle. This natural cleaning method is a great way to remove smells from the dishwasher.


Note: if you have leftover water in the bottom of the dishwasher after a cycle, you have a partial clog in either the food chopping screen or the water ejector line.

  1. Deep Freezer Defrost

If you’re tired of taking hours to defrost the chest freezer, then this method is what you’re looking for.
</br>Either turn off the thermostat or unplug the freezer. Remove all foods. Layer 10 paper towels in the bottom. Place a large pot of boiling water on the paper towels, close the lid, and leave for 30 minutes (If frost is extremely bad, this process can be repeated). Use the paper towels to wipe up any remaining moisture.

  1. Ceiling Fans

When fans spin, the attract dust (for why, see #2 here- 25 Grossest Areas in the Home). To clean the tops of the blades, a swifter works well because of the large amount of dust it holds. If a swifter is not available, place the fan blade inside the pillow case and wipe the dust into the inside of the pillow case.

  1. Windows

Easily clean windows like the pro’s with dish soap, warm water, a bucket, and a squeegee. Mix a tablespoon of dish soap with two gallons of water. Use the foam side of the squeegee to apply the solution to the window, then flip the squeegee to remove the solution for a perfect, streak-free window. Bonus: a long pole can be attached to the squeegee to reach second floor windows without getting on a ladder.

  1. Vacuum Cleaner

Vacuum cleaner “cleaning” is commonly forgotten, but needs to be done on a regular basis. Most new vacuums have reusable air filters installed. Remove the air filters, rinse with hot water, and let air dry. The brush in the vacuum head also accumulates hair and fibers. Cut them with scissors and remove them to allow the vacuum to clean to the best of its ability.

  1. Stovetop

Use a wet soft scrubbing sponge to remove bits of baked-on food and wipe clean. Mix baking soda and water to a paste-like consistency and scrub to remove stubborn build-up on cooking rings. (This method works for traditional and glass-top stoves)

  1. Shelves

Remove all items from the shelves and use a damp soft scrubbing sponge to wipe clean. If the shelves are made of unfinished wood, either be very careful with a damp sponge (to prevent wood warping), or wipe with a dry sponge.

  1. Shower heads

Minerals from the water flowing through the shower head slowly leave deposits inside the shower head. Removing the buildup can be done with regular household items.

Get a gallon ziplock bag and fill halfway with half white vinegar and half water. Remove shower head from piping and place in the bag. Squeeze the bag to remove air and let sit overnight. Reinstall shower head in the morning.

Have a large shower head that needs cleaning? Use a bucket instead of a bag and adjust the vinegar and water mixture accordingly.

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